Community

“Are Ewe Okay”

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In 2014 figures released by the Office for National Statistics showed that people in the UK are among the most lonely and isolated in Europe. The ONS data compared the UK with the rest of Europe. The UK came second from bottom for not feeling close to people in their local area. Germany came bottom and Cyprus came top. Loneliness and isolation can have a major impact on people’s wellbeing and mental health.

In the latest ONS Survey “Measuring national well-being: Life in the UK, Apr 2017” it shows that whilst many aspects of our lives have improved, areas that have deteriorated over a 3-year basis included the mental well-being of the population.

Isolation & loneliness affects many in our countryside and this was recognised by young people working within the agricultural industry. The Scottish Association of Young Farmers Clubs (SAYFC) began the mental health awareness campaign “Are EWE Okay” in May 2016 during mental health awareness week. They recognised that there was a stigma associated with mental health issues, people working in the agriculture & rural industries are often working on their own so are facing isolation and through the nature of the work people often find it difficult to access services or support. Through the campaign they aimed to challenge the attitudes towards mental wellbeing for the industry’s next generation. In October 2017 their campaign was named as a ‘Farming Hero’ during the British Farming Awards.

Social media is often criticised for a variety of reasons, however in this instance it is being used in a positive way by a recognised body to reach its members – young people, who may otherwise have no one to turn to. The principles of ‘Are Ewe OK’ can so easily be transferred to anyone so perhaps we could all ask ‘Are you ok’?

Council Budget Plans – Have Your Say

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This year there is a brand new approach to simplify and illustrate the challenges faced – make your voice heard.

Each year, Aberdeenshire Council engages with staff and local residents on budget plans to ensure the voice of communities comes through in any and all budget setting decisions.

This year, in place of traditional surveys and written text, is a suite of infographics. Each paints a picture of a different part of council budget setting. Attached to each infographic is a short set of questions, in some cases just two questions, where you can share your views. Please respond to as many topics as you feel passionate about.

The engagement process is open now to anyone who lives and works in Aberdeenshire. It will close at the start of January, giving enough time for the results to be passed to councillors who in turn will use them to inform their decision making for the coming financial year.

View the infographics and associated questions on the Aberdeenshire Council website.

Kincardine & Mearns Community Plan

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Priority 9 Engaged Communities – 3rd review

SpiritCatterlineCommunity

 

 

Intended Outcomes:

Local residents are actively involved in developing vibrant and resilient communities, of place and of interest, which support the needs of all their members.  These communities are increasingly empowered by revitalising and broadening community engagement opportunities. Read the rest of this entry »

Engaged Communities Supporting Themselves – 2nd Review

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ID-100115004

Local residents are actively involved in developing vibrant and resilient communities, of place and of interest, which support the needs of all their members.  These communities are increasingly empowered by revitalising and broadening community engagement opportunities. Read the rest of this entry »

Engaged Communities Supporting Themselves – 1st Review

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TraM Volunteers - Fettercairn Allotments
TraM Volunteers – Fettercairn Allotments

We will support local residents to be actively involved in developing vibrant, resilient increasingly empowered communities which support the needs of all their members.  Read the rest of this entry »