Month: April 2018

Area’s natural history is the star in “The Wild North East – Scotland’s Natural Gem”

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A short film highlighting the wonderful wildlife and wild places throughout the north east of Scotland was launched last week.

“The Wild North East – Scotland’s Natural Gem” was commissioned by the North East Scotland Biodiversity Partnership, of which Aberdeenshire Council is an active member and supporter.

The film was the idea of Doug Gooday, one of Aberdeenshire Council’s Rangers, who wanted to create a short film to promote the wonderful wildlife and wild places we are so fortunate to enjoy here.
“As a Council Ranger I’m very privileged to spend a lot of time in the many wild places we have in Aberdeenshire, from the Cairngorms to the Coast,” he said.
“I wanted to inspire others to enjoy these wild places as well, to understand about the services nature provides and the importance of caring for the natural environment for the benefit of ourselves and future generations.”
The new film was produced by the nature media company Scotland: The Big Picture.
The collective specialises in producing high-quality short films which inspire and inform people on the importance of looking after our natural world.
The film was produced with the support of Aberdeenshire Council, Aberdeen City Council, Scottish Natural Heritage, Outdoor and Woodland Learning Scotland, the North East Biodiversity Partnership and Forestry Commission Scotland – Grampian Conservancy.
It was launched on Friday, April 13 at the James Hutton Institute in Aberdeen and is freely available for anyone to use and distribute for education and to promote the natural heritage of our region.
You can see the video on the council’s YouTube channel​.

Using Schools as Community Hubs

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Schools across Scotland should be used as community hubs to deliver a wide range of public services.

That’s the verdict of South Ayrshire Council and its partners following a pilot in north Ayr, which culminated in a community marketplace at Ayr Academy on 23 February.

A range of partners from NHS, Scottish Fire and Rescue service and the voluntary sector worked together to explore how this would work in practice.

Crucially, services were available to everyone living in the area – not just those with children in the schools.

Services provided included money and debt management advice, employability and skills information and advice, health and wellbeing support from school nurses and assistant nurse practitioners. Council Leader, Douglas Campbell, commented on the learning from the pilot,
“It’s been a terrific learning opportunity for all the partners involved and that’s been one of the key outcomes of this week – getting to know more about what each of us has to offer and how we can better link in and signpost to provide a more joined-up service for people.”

Read more at http://thirdforcenews.org.uk/tfn-news/schools-should-be-used-as-community-hubs#im6LrHufaQ4Ga4ce.99